Land Acknowledgement

The Town of Grimsby recognized land acknowledgements as part of reconciliation and recognizing the traditional or treaty territories of Indigenous peoples.  The statements are typically made at the introduction of meetings, gatherings, events, or presentations.  The following statements are used by the Town of Grimsby, in collaboration with partners in the Niagara Region, and these statements can be used by other local organizations for similar purposes.

SHORT VERSION

(Can be read at the beginning of meetings, presentations, or gatherings)  

Niagara Region/Grimsby is situated on treaty land. This land is steeped in the rich history of the First Nations such as the Hatiwendaronk (Hat-i-wen-DA-ronk), the Haudenosaunee (Hoe-den-no-SHOW-nee), and the Anishinaabe (Ah-nish-ih-NAH-bey), including the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. There are many First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people from across Turtle Island that live and work in Niagara today. The Regional Municipality of Niagara/Grimsby stands with all Indigenous peoples, past and present, in promoting the wise stewardship of the lands on which we live.

LONG VERSION

(Can be used for official openings, large public gatherings, and at any event when a prominent Indigenous person (Chief or Band Councillor), or political representative of the Provincial or Federal government is present.)

 As we take a moment today to reflect on the importance of the land on which we gather, our provider and sustainer, we look to understand the history of the land. Niagara Region/Grimsby is situated on treaty land. These lands are steeped in the rich history of the First Nations such as the Hatiwendaronk (Hat-i-wen-DA-ronk), the Haudenosaunee (Hoe-den-no-SHOW-nee), and the Anishinaabe (Ah-nish-ih-NAH-bey), including the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. Intended to guide the relationship between the First Nations and Europeans, the Two Row Wampum is an important symbol of everlasting equality, peace, and friendship. It remains the foundation upon which Canada was built, and we recognize that this mutually respectful relationship between nations is essential for reconciliation today.

There are many First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people from across Turtle Island that live and work in Niagara today. The Regional Municipality of Niagara stands with all Indigenous peoples, past and present, in promoting the wise stewardship of the lands on which we live. We recognize that we must do more to learn about the history and current situation of Indigenous people. This will help us better understand our roles and take responsibility towards reconciliation as treaty people, residents, and caretakers.

RESOURCES

We encourage community members to learn further about Truth and Reconciliation both at local levels and at broader levels.  

Truth and Reconciliation of Canada -website

National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation

Orangeshirtday.org

Fort Erie Friendship Centre

 

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